SecondaryEd news 21 Mar 2017

Zoning; cost of police vets; school property projects; Salisbury school; Polyfest finishes up; opinion pieces on - technology in schools, corporal punishment, consent, disobedient teaching (enjoyed listening to this), and performance pay (NZ Initiative yet again); and, in the spirit of union sisterhood (and truth), an excerpt from the Washington Teachers' Union on what their teachers think of the IMPACT pay scheme ...

Media items selected by the PPTA Te Wehengarua as an update on secondary education and union issues in the news, with the main focus on New Zealand.

East Christchurch schools to zone following unexpected post-quake growth
Police vet checks to come at cost to school
$3.6m New Plymouth school property projects underway
$1.6 mill for new classrooms at New Plymouth Kura Kaupapa
Education Minister Hekia Parata accused of 'vendetta' over Salisbury School
Parents 'heartbroken' that Ministry has misled them about Salisbury
Shortages in quality applicants for faculty positions gallery
Back to the manual in tech-free classrooms
Wrap up: 9000 students takes to stage at Polyfest
Why corporal punishment doesn't work
Want consent taught as part of sex education? You have the power
Disobedient Teaching (audio)
Roger Partridge: Students' futures depend on paying teachers right
Teachers more valued than support staff, say workers
Auckland school puts asbestos removal on hold
Tertiary shake-up: Scrap interest-free loans, ditch University Entrance (Tertiary)
'Our school has cut to the bone. Our teachers are on their knees' (UK)
Government's bid to reduce workload has made things worse, say teachers (Scotland)
Pisa boss: Pupils 'should be taught to recognise fake news' (OECD)
Why are Utah teachers leaving their jobs at such a rate? (US)
Evaluation/IMPACT (Washington Teachers' Union on the Impact Pay scheme (January 2016))

East Christchurch schools to zone following unexpected post-quake growth
ELE REDMOND, March 2017
... Linwood College principal Richard Edmundson said there had been "no formal discussion" about zoning for the high school, but he could "quite easily see" a zone being implemented once Linwood's primary schoolers progressed to secondary.
Zoning was not perfect but was better than the alternatives: overcrowding and wasted taxpayer dollars, he said.

Police vet checks to come at cost to school
LAURA WALTERS, March 20 2017
... On Monday, police announced it would conduct free checks for the first 20 checks a school or ECE commissioned, and charge $10 per check for every additional person. These fees would help cover costs of increasing numbers of checks, police said.

$3.6m New Plymouth school property projects underway
Nikki Kaye, 20 March, 2017
Soil turning ceremonies today will mark the start of two education construction projects in New Plymouth, at Spotswood College and the wharekura Te Pi’ipi’inga Kakano Mai Rangiatea, says Associate Education Minister Nikki Kaye.

$1.6 mill for new classrooms at New Plymouth Kura Kaupapa
Monday 20 March 2017
A soil turning ceremony today marked the start of a $1.6 million construction project in New Plymouth at Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Te Pi’ipi’inga Kakano Mai Rangiatea.

Education Minister Hekia Parata accused of 'vendetta' over Salisbury School
HERIE SIVIGNON, March 2017
The Public Service Association has called on Education Minister Hekia Parata to "step up, front up and stop dodging questions" over the future of Salisbury School.
Salisbury is a residential school in Richmond, near Nelson, that caters for girls from years 3 to 11 who have complex intellectual impairment.

Parents 'heartbroken' that Ministry has misled them about Salisbury
Fuseworks Media, Monday, 20 March, 2017
Parents of children with intellectual impairment who want their daughters to attend Salisbury School say they are "heartbroken" that the Ministry of Education has misled them for years about the school being closed.
The parents’ statements are included in further feedback from Salisbury this month to the Ministry relating to its future. The school is open and still awaiting Education Minister Hon Hekia Parata’s interim decision of whether or not the school will be closed later this year. Consultation started in June 2016. The Minister first attempted to close the school in 2012 but lost in the High Court.

Shortages in quality applicants for faculty positions gallery
MEGHAN LAWRENCE,  March 21 2017
A shortage of teachers in New Zealand's largest city is continuing to cause major stress for school leaders.
Principals throughout Auckland are expressing concerns over the diminishing number and quality of teaching staff throughout the city.
Pakuranga College principal Michael Williams says hiring staff for 2017 was the hardest he has experienced.

Back to the manual in tech-free classrooms
Tuesday, 21 March 2017
The tech zealots in education need to be reined in by the grumpy Luddites, Peter Lyons writes.
I have banned the use of electronic devices in my classroom. Maybe I have become a grumpy old teacher unwilling to evolve with the times. I don't think so. I was grumpy as a young teacher. But I am starting to have considerable reservations about the use of technology in the classroom.

Wrap up: 9000 students takes to stage at Polyfest
KYMBERLEE FERNANDES, March 20 2017
Song and dance, kapa haka performances, bright coloured outfits and a whole lot of food are what made up the last week for most South Auckland students.
Everyone was either competing or celebrating all things Polynesia for four days at the Manukau Sports Bowl.

Why corporal punishment doesn't work
RNZ, 20 March 2017, By Jack Boyle
Opinion - Since corporal punishment was banned in New Zealand in 1987, there have been periodic grumbles that it's causing moral turpitude in the young.
The latest is from the National Party's Kaikohe chair Alan Price, who made the claim following incidents of vandalism and theft by groups of young people in the town.

Want consent taught as part of sex education? You have the power
JO MOIR, March 20 2017
OPINION: Hey parents and students - if you want sexual consent taught in schools then guess what? You can make it happen.
The last few weeks have been dominated by headlines, comment pieces, protests and petitions over an alleged rape culture in New Zealand and whether students are being taught about consent and it being OK to say no.

Disobedient Teaching (audio)
From Nine To Noon
Calls from a veteran award winning educator for teachers to stop over-assessing students, and start to breaking the rules. Welby Ings is a Professor of Design at the Auckland University of Technology. His new book, Disobedient Teaching: Surviving and creating change in education, explores how teachers can navigate and and influence the education system, which he believes is obsessed with assessment.

Roger Partridge: Students' futures depend on paying teachers right
Tuesday Mar 21, 2017
It is easy to understand the teachers' unions' objections to performance-based pay. At least if this means basing teachers' salaries solely on the performance of their students in end-of-year tests. As ACG Sunderland principal Nathan Villars pointed out in this newspaper, that would hardly be fair on the teachers with the less able students. Nor would it incentivise the best teachers to teach in the schools where they might be needed the most.

Teachers more valued than support staff, say workers
DONNA-LEE BIDDLE, March 20 2017
Teacher aides, librarians and learning assistants are at the bottom of the educational food chain, says a support worker.
And with the government freezing operational funding - the money used to pay support workers - it means vulnerable children will also miss out.

Auckland school puts asbestos removal on hold
Sally Murphy, 20 March 2017
The Ministry of Education has delayed plans to remove 700 tonnes of asbestos-contaminated soil from an Auckland school.

Tertiary
Tertiary shake-up: Scrap interest-free loans, ditch University Entrance
Sarah Harris, Tuesday, 21 March 2017
A radical new report calls for interest on student loans to be reintroduced and University Entrance to be scrapped.
The 527-page study, out today, was commissioned by the Government to examine how well the tertiary education system is set up to respond to trends in technology, internationalisation, population, tuition costs and demand for skills.

New models of tertiary education (report)

UK
'Our school has cut to the bone. Our teachers are on their knees'
Sally Weale Education correspondent, Thursday 16 March 2017
Ministers want to distribute funding more fairly around England, but schools say there just isn’t enough cash overall.

Scotland
Government's bid to reduce workload has made things worse, say teachers
Emma Seith, 10th March 2017
Teachers predict three more years of 'chaotic change' as a result of the scrapping of unit assessments
Nearly two-thirds of secondary teachers believe the Scottish government’s high-profile decision to scrap unit assessments to reduce workload is actually going to increase their burden and put more pressure on pupils, a survey seen by TESS reveals.
The move was education secretary John Swinney’s big announcement at September’s Scottish Learning Festival, when the government bowed to pressure from the teaching unions and decided to remove mrandatory unit assessments at National 5 and Higher.

OECD
Pisa boss: Pupils 'should be taught to recognise fake news'
Will Hazell, 18th March 2017
Pisa boss Andreas Schleicher argues young people should be taught to recognise fake news, as OECD plans to test "global competencies"
Children should be taught in schools how to recognise "fake news", a leading international education expert has said.
Andreas Schleicher, the OECD’s director of education and skills, said schools needed to teach pupils how to think critically and analyse what they read on social media and news sites.

US
Why are Utah teachers leaving their jobs at such a rate?
By Marjorie Cortez, Published: March 13, 2017, Updated: March 18, 2017
SALT LAKE CITY — Utah’s state and local policymakers “should be alarmed at the high numbers of teachers leaving the state teaching core, particularly in the first few years,” recent public policy reports caution.
More than half — 56 percent — of the public school educators who started teaching in 2008 left the profession by 2015, according to a recent report by the Utah Education Policy Center at the University of Utah.

Washington Teachers' Union on the Impact Pay scheme (January 2016)

Evaluation/IMPACT

“The true test of a teacher evaluation process is one that teachers like.”
 
Our current evaluation system (IMPACT) is universally detested by teachers (and other school based staff) and is invariably identified by our members as their number one issue. It is a major source of stress, drives teacher churn, and inhibits creativity in the classroom. It fosters an unhealthy atmosphere of fear, distrust, and competitiveness in the local school.

It is inherently unfair that various groups of teachers are judged by unequal standards and different measures of performance. The IMPACT process does not take into account the vast differences in working conditions and characteristics of students across the district.

IMPACT fails to accurately identify the best or worst teachers. It suffers from problems of validity and reliability and is subject to abuse and manipulation. The evaluation tool frequently rates a teacher high one year, low the next. It is highly subjective and used as a punitive measure to get rid of effective teachers.

IMPACT is expensive to implement, and necessitates increased recruiting and onboarding expenses.

There is no evidence that IMPACT has improved teaching and learning. The only application of the present evaluation system is to identify and separate low performing teachers rather than to develop teacher capacity. A low performing teacher may be identified early in the year, but the students will be left to suffer the consequences for the remainder of the year, because no effective, systematic program exists to help teachers
improve their practice.

Our solution is first, to reorient the evaluation process for the purpose of forming and developing a high performing instructional team in each local school. Secondly, the responsibility of providing and maintaining teaching excellence, is recognized as a collective responsibility, including administration, rather than the sole responsibility of the isolated teacher. There are many time-tested, nationally recognized models of teacher
evaluation for us to draw on, that go far beyond sorting the “bad” from the “good” teacher, and effectively support teacher growth within a realistic time frame.

http://www.wtulocal6.org/usr/2016/pdf/WTU%20DCPS%20Contract%20Talks%20January%2012-2016.pdf

Last modified on Wednesday, 22 March 2017 11:12