SecondaryEd news 16 Mar 2017

University Entrance review - the article links to the discussion document, have your say by 28 April; Teach First struggles to find a new partner; the NCEA exam mistakes last year; school fraud; roll growth and school buildings; more on consent; and Andrew Little asks Paula Bennett about affordable housing for teachers ...

Media items selected by the PPTA Te Wehengarua as an update on secondary education and union issues in the news, with the main focus on New Zealand.

Review recommends no change to University Entrance
Teach First faces uncertain future
Last-minute changes led to mistakes in NCEA exam papers
Students disadvantaged by handling of maths error (audio)
Auckland schools desperately want the Government to plan for roll growth
Ministry reveals extent of known school frauds - and more are likely to be unknown
Paeroa College academy days prepare students for life
High school clamps down
More in-school support is needed to deal with rape culture
Wellington College students stood down over rape comments
Wellington College rape comments apology doesn't mention women
Editorial: Discussion of real sex can counter 'rape culture'
International student numbers jump in Western Bay
Increase in funding needed to pay support staff more
Mike Chunn on why New Zealand songs need saving
Affordable housing for teachers in Auckland- Andrew Little to the Prime Minister (video)
Australian principal allegedly bashed with a garden stake by a student trying to enroll (Australia)
NASUWT lays down gauntlet on cutbacks and teacher pay row (Northern Ireland)


Review recommends no change to University Entrance
John Gerritsen, @RNZeducation
University Entrance does not need changing despite some complaints it has become too complex, a review of the award has concluded.

Teach First faces uncertain future
Shane Cowlishaw
A controversial trainee teacher programme is scrambling to find a new partner after splitting with the University of Auckland.
Teach First NZ, a private training programme that places graduates in low decile schools, is in a race against time.
Based on a UK model, the New Zealand arm took its first intake of teachers with fanfare in 2013.
It aims to fill teacher shortages in subject areas like maths, science, and Māori, by paying trainees an on-the-job salary for two years following an initial eight weeks’ training.

Last-minute changes led to mistakes in NCEA exam papers
Wednesday Mar 15, 2017
Late changes in a top-level school exam maths paper led to a mistake so bad students could not answer the question.
In a just-released review into last year's error-ridden NCEA papers, an expert panel says no one individual was responsible for the mistakes, including a major blunder in a maths paper that left students in tears, but is asking the national qualifications body that sets the exams to tighten checking procedures.

Students disadvantaged by handling of maths error (audio)
From Checkpoint, 5:50 pm on 15 March 2017
Students may have missed out on excellence grades due to a serious mistake in an NCEA maths exam last year, which was added to the paper too late to be checked.

Auckland schools desperately want the Government to plan for roll growth
ZIZI SPARKS AND AMY BAKER, March 15 2017
Auckland principals are frustrated by a lack of long-term planning, as they face ever-increasing numbers of students on their rolls.
North Shore Principals' Association president Craig Holt said new buildings are at the top of the agenda across Auckland.

Ministry reveals extent of known school frauds - and more are likely to be unknown
KATARINA WILLIAMS, March 15 2017
Fraud in schools has swallowed up at least $1.5 million of taxpayer funding over the past three years, according to the Ministry of Education.
The figure is likely to be much higher, because it includes only those cases investigated by the ministry. School boards are not obliged to seek the ministry's help if they choose not to.

Paeroa College academy days prepare students for life
JILL CLEAVE, March 15 2017
There is an eerie silence around the grounds and hallways of Paeroa College on Fridays as students choose to do things they enjoy doing.
Friday is Academy Day which is when year 11,12 and 13 students opt into their chosen academy for the whole day.

High school clamps down
By Paul Taylor, 16 March 2017
A Queenstown high school is to begin wheel-clamping the cars of pupils who park in staff spots.
Wakatipu High School has introduced clamping to discourage pupils, parents, neighbours and commuters from using its car park.

More in-school support is needed to deal with rape culture
Wednesday, 15 March 2017, Press Release: New Zealand Association of Counsellors
More in-school support is needed to deal with rape culture, says school guidance counsellors
The NZ Association of Counsellors (NZAC) wants action in schools to prevent one in four girls and one in six boys from experiencing sexual assault in New Zealand.
The NZAC wants universal access to programmes such as ‘Mates and Dates’ (ACC) in all NZ high schools.

Wellington College students stood down over rape comments
15/03/2017, By Cleo Fraser and Emma Hurley
Wellington College has stood down two students for five days as a result of comments they made about rape, and the unnamed students have issued apologies.
The school's board of trustees made the announcement on Wednesday afternoon.

Wellington College rape comments apology doesn't mention women
RNZ
Two Wellington students who posted comments encouraging people to rape drunk, unconscious girls don't seem to fully understand the harm they have done, a sexual violence specialist says.

Editorial: Discussion of real sex can counter 'rape culture'
Thursday Mar 16, 2017
The teenage school pupils who marched on Parliament on Monday to protest at "rape culture" knew what they were talking about, and so does everybody else.
Their protest was not prompted by an actual rape but by juvenile jokes about rape exchanged online between some Wellington College students.

International student numbers jump in Western Bay
Ruth Keber, Thursday Mar 16, 2017
The number of international students living in the Bay has jumped from 700 in 2014 to over 2,500 in the last financial year.
The Economic Impact of International Education Infometrics report showed in the 2015 to 2016 financial year, 2718 international students were enrolled in Tauranga and Western Bay of Plenty schools, which pumped $68 million into the region.

Increase in funding needed to pay support staff more
By Mikaela Collins, Thursday Mar 16, 2017
The funding received by schools is not enough to afford a 2 per cent pay rise requested by support staff, a Northland teacher aide says.
This has complicated ongoing collective agreement negotiations between education union NZEI and the Ministry of Education.

Mike Chunn on why New Zealand songs need saving
By Mike Chunn, March 16, 2017
New Zealand needs to celebrate its songwriting to ensure great songs get written here, says Play It Strange CEO Mike Chunn.
Songwriting has stormed through the school gates and is now drawing in many year 13 students who want to fire up their imaginations and write songs. They may have done this before and are maintaining their creativity on a wider plane. Or they may have been stalwarts of the school’s creative writing programme and see songwriting as a new adventure.

Affordable housing for teachers in Auckland- Andrew Little to the Prime Minister (video)
15 March 2017, Duration: 05:26
Question 3 -ANDREW LITTLE to the Prime Minister: Does he stand by his statement that it’s “not true” that teachers can’t afford to buy a home in Auckland, given many reports of teachers leaving Auckland due to housing costs and of principals struggling to fill vacancies?

Australia
Australian principal allegedly bashed with a garden stake by a student trying to enroll
March 15 2017
An Australian high school student has been charged with bashing a school principal with a wooden garden stake at school.
The 13-year-old boy allegedly lashed out at the principal of western New South Wales's Bourke High School, Andrew Ryder, as the pair were standing near the front gate of the school on Tuesday afternoon.

Northern Ireland
NASUWT lays down gauntlet on cutbacks and teacher pay row
By Rebecca Black, March 13 2017
The largest teachers' union in Northern Ireland - which has staged two strikes in the past five months - has warned it will continue to "vigorously oppose" any further cuts to the education budget.

 

Delivered to your inbox by email should you so wish.

Use the signup below...

weblink Sign up for email updates (you will receive a confirmation email)

Last modified on Friday, 17 March 2017 10:58